Thursday, February 02, 2006

Recommended Books #2




Mama, Do You Love Me?
by Barbara M. Joosse
iluustrated by Barbara Lavallee

General Description: This is an Inuit folktale that is really nice story that will make you feel warm and fuzzy all over. It is beautifully illustrated and depicts a young girl attempts to find the limits of her mother's love. She repeatedly asks throughout the story, "Mama, do you love me?" and comes up with many intriguing and playful reasons why her mother might be persuaded to say no, such as putting salmon in her parka or an ermine in her muluks. The message is simple, no matter what we do our mother's will always love us.

Grade Level Suitability: K-2

Links to BC Curriculum: Grade 2-3 Social studies-demonstrating an awareness of British Columbia's and Canada's diverse heritage and describing how physical environment influences human activities. Also, the Personal Planning curriculum- mental well being section talking about feelings and emotions. This book is a good way to personalize different cultures and show that even far away people have the same feelings and experience the same emotions as you.

The Mitten
by Jan Brett

General Description: This is another folktale, this time from the Ukraine. The story is about a boy named Nicki, who begs his grandmother to knit him a pair of white mittens. In spite of her warnings that he will lose them and that they will be hard to find in the snow, he insists and she finally does so. Grandmothers, however, are usually right and it isn't long before we notice, although he does not, that he has dropped a mitten. A mole is the first to discover the mitten lying on the snow and crawls inside, followed by a snowshoe rabbit, a hedgehog, an owl, a badger, a fox, a bear and, finally a mouse. Each time the inhabitants protest that there's not enough room for the newcomer, but to no avail and grandmother's skillful knitting holds fast as the mitten stretches beyond belief.

Grade Level Suitability: K-2

Links to BC Curriculum: Language Arts- Engagement and Personal Response. This book could also very easily be integrated into Visual Arts. The author Jan Brett has an awesome webpage where you can download a mitten and the animals from the story to colour, cut out, and glue them to the mitten (as well as tonnes of other great activities)

http://www.janbrett.com/


Harriet the Spy
by Louise Fitzhugh

General Description: An absolute classic that has a strong female heroine but appeals to boys just as much as it does to girls. Harriet is a character that we can all identify with. She is a curious and intelligent girl who is fascinated with the lives of the people around her so she spies on them and writes down all her observations in her secret notebook. When her classmates find her notebook and read her painfully blunt comments about them, Harriet finds herself a lonely outcast. As old as the book is (first published in 1977) the writing is very real and kids today can still relate to the peer struggles that go on between 5th and 7th grade.

Grade Level Suitability: Grade 5-7

Links to BC Curriculum: Language Arts- Engagement and Personal Response.

The Incredible Journey by Sheila Burnford

General Description: A great adventure story of three animals-a young Labrador Retriever, an aging Bull Terrier, and a fiesty Siamese cat who take on a dangerous journey through the Canadian wilderness in search of their family home. Together they go through all kinds of trials, get seperated at times, but through it all the friendship and teamwork of the three companions holds strong. A very touching and emotional story (especially for animal lovers).

Grade Level Suitability: 5-6

Links to BC Curriculum: Language Arts (a great book for a novel study).

1 Comments:

At 3:34 PM, Blogger Cathy said...

Harriet the Spy! I didn't remember that book until you wrote about it, what a great choice!

Lots of fun CSI/investigative stuff you could do with this book, good science connections!

Thanks for your suggestions. (also the Mitten... I love Jann Brett!)

Cathy

 

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